Business Presentation Tips – Focus Attention and Get Results

Too much to do? No time to do it? You’re not alone.

Participants are often overloaded, overworked, and preoccupied. They are often distracted by urgent business issues, family matters, sick pets, or other pulls on their attention.

As a presenter, it’s up to you to focus their attention. By giving clear directions, you can focus attention. Learn how to build a message that is easy for people to remember.

This is not rocket science. Instead, it’s a repeatable formula you can use whenever you want to focus attention. Create a strong message and pack a punch. Help participants remember your message, decide to take action, and know what action to take.

Use these 3 tips so you can focus attention and get results. This is absolutely critical if you are serious about winning results.

Here’s how to give clear directions to your audience, so they know exactly what step to take next.

Tip 1: Decide On A Single Action

It’s up to you. Focus on a single action you want your audience to take. Don’t mush things up by giving three or ten possible actions. It will only confuse your audience.

Decide on one action. If you have two, twelve, or twenty — no one will know what to do.

Recently I coached a brilliant and experienced senior sales director. He was confused between two actions for his presentation. One was organizational: a strategic initiative to increase sales. The other targeted sales bonuses and commissions.

Guess which one I recommended for his single action?

The individual one of course! Focus on a single action that individuals are most willing to take. Everyone gets into gear when it’s personal. When you’re talking cash, people get moving.

Tip 2: State The Action In Simple Terms

It’s easy to understand and remember simple terms. When you state directions in simple terms, participants get it. And it’s easy for them to remember what to do.

Speak plain English. Avoid speaking in corporate speak.

Hint: Take a look at your presentation. Ask yourself one question. “Could I say this with a shorter word?”

If you can, do it. If you aren’t sure, ask a friend. Best shot is to ask someone who doesn’t work with you. It’s just too easy to get used to using inside lingo — and not realize you’re doing this.

Tip 3: Use Active Language

Active words ignite action. Passive words encourage contemplation.

You want your audience to jump into action. Your goal is to create an active environment focused on results.

Now is the time for active verbs, active terms, and dynamic language.

Clients often tell me their concerns and objections about giving simple directions to inspire action. These usually run along the lines of:

  •  Is this too simplistic?
  •  Is this right for my highly educated audience?
  •  Is this going to make me look dumb?

The answer is no. Speaking in active language is not ‘dumbing-down.’

When you give clear, focused directions, you are helping your audience. They instantly know what to do next. This is appropriate for audiences of every educational level.

Here’s what you can expect. It is going to make you look smart. Very, very smart. Especially when you ignite action and get measurable results.

Get results fast. It’s smart business to focus on a single action, use simple words and active language.